Home > Uncategorized > Memorialization: The positives and the negatives

Memorialization: The positives and the negatives

I’m in group C, and our research presentation focuses on the idea of memorialization. When we first began discussing how we are going to go about our research project, the idea of memorialization seemed so simple. I’ve seen tons of memorials throughout my life; the World War II memorial, the Vietnam memorial, the Oklahoma City Bombing memorial, and the list goes on and on. But as we continued discussing, we realized that while the word memorialization has a positive connotation, that isn’t always the case. Just as a statue, or a plaque can serve as memorialization so can a stereotype or a societal legacy. In fact, the way I see it is that the latter are the more traditional forms of memorialization. Before governments or civilizations had the idea to create statues or gardens, they had the idea to create laws, laws that were reminiscent of social customs and norms. Those social customs and norms then became rules that everyone was forced to abide by, and by reflecting the values and beliefs of one part of the population these government texts are in some ways memorials in their own right. As we continue to research the idea of memorialization as we see it in our group, I believe that it will be imperative to pay close attention to both positive and negative forms of memorialization, and ask the question of which one has historically been more persuasive.

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Categories: Uncategorized
  1. lhennigan
    February 15, 2011 at 11:45 pm

    I’m really excited to see how this aspect of the project turns out! I think that this was one of the most interesting point of views that we considered with our project because most people think that memorials are positive and just represent things that we don’t always remember. They are a symbol of the past that can be constant in the present for us to reflect on. We never really think about how there are negative kinds of memorialization because these types are never like concrete. We can’t always see or touch these types of memorialization so thats why they aren’t always recognized.

  2. krcoleman
    February 16, 2011 at 12:26 am

    I think a really significant question here will be how you define a memorial or form of memorialization. There are so many different ways in which we commemorate the past and I think that the way we memorialize things says as much as what we choose to memorialize. I’m really interested to see what your group finds out!

  3. February 17, 2011 at 9:26 am

    “Just as a statue, or a plaque can serve as memorialization so can a stereotype or a societal legacy. In fact, the way I see it is that the latter are the more traditional forms of memorialization.”

    That was absolutely brilliant — I think you and Group C are really on to something important here & I can’t wait to hear more about how the research is going. Well done!

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